The Day You Meet Carl Sandburg

The day you meet Carl Sandburg is the day you see the DVD, The Day Carl Sandburg Died . Since you're a glutton for special features, you meet Penelope Niven, Sandburg's biographer. She quotes Sandburg from “Horse Fiddle,” and she describes this as the essence of his journey. “The road I am on is a…

The day you meet Carl Sandburg is the day you see the DVD, The Day Carl Sandburg Died . Since you're a glutton for special features, you meet Penelope Niven, Sandburg's biographer. She quotes Sandburg from “Horse Fiddle,” and she describes this as the essence of his journey. “The road I am on is a long road and I can go hungry again like I have gone hungry before.

The day you meet Carl Sandburg is the day you find out he's the poet accused of not writing poetry at all. When you read The People, Yes , you think you're reading the words of a journalist who has jumped freight trains and has walked the beat along sidewalks. After landing in jail once in Pittsburgh for riding the rails, he sings, stays out of jail, eats “regular,” gets what writes writes, and a little love at home when he is not being the Eternal Hobo.

Biographer of Penelope Niven uses the letters of Sandburg as practical tools; and in doing so, she gives you the sense of having written those letters yourself. Like any great teacher or “guiding star,” as Langston Hughes calls him, Sandburg has his own kindred spirit – Walt Whitman. Sandburg pays homage to Whitman in his autobiography, Ever the Winds of Chance , while standing at Whitman's tomb. Whitman had scrimped and saved for that grave. “He did not know,” says Sandburg, “he would not need the tomb and that Leaves of Grass would keep his memory greener than any receptacle of granite.” There is the passage of the torch; and, like Whitman, Sandburg becomes a poet of urgency, called to speak louder through his writing and to speak out , not against those who are living satisfied. His critics now accuse him of writing socialist propaganda, yet he asserts his own individuality and continues on his own path.

The day you meet Carl Sandburg is the day you yearn to soak up everything he writes. And if you're a writer, Sandburg becomes your “guiding star.” You become not only a pioneer in your projects, but an adventurer and explorer plunging heedlessly into streams of new challenges. Like Sandburg, you discover you have more laughs and tears in you than any human clay pot you know. You discover your interior life, riding the rails along with Sandburg, taking his tour of Chicago, and solving all your problems even though you are lonely at times. This is the day you find the essence of your journey, one on which you can never feel lost or lonely because Sandburg is with you along for the ride on that freight train.

There is a bumping desire to reach mankind everywhere in the arts: poetry, painting, music, and the theater can no longer stand aloof and be the expression of an individual. We must have something larger. “This is a hell of a place,” says Sandburg, “for a poet without a poet desires to get his head knocked. world gets fed and clothed. ” The day you meet Carl Sandburg is the day you decide to create your own notoriety, your own story, and your own news; and after having done so, you intend to be remembered and rediscovered one day yourself.

Like Sandburg, you go from one project to the next, and you never stop learning to write. At 71, he is still experimenting, pioneering, hoboing, and studying his craft. In a public recital or in a book you write, you are only doing what you would be doing if you were home alone. You know hunger, and you know you can put one foot ahead of another and walk hundreds of miles on your journey. And now that you've discovered that you are a journeyman yourself, this is the day of being remembered and rediscovered. This is an exciting time in your creative life. Now is the time you write masterpieces and show off your bits of genius. You welcome critics who spew comments about your unfathomable writings.

The time you are spending writing is generating a readership who digs into your books and blogs. You are writers with a thousand stories. “Find a framework. Then write it,” says Carl Sandburg. “Then overwrite it and cut it down. Let no day pass without writing it … you have only to go to your memories and to the wellsprings of your own heart for what is termed material. of whatever you need to be taught will have to come out of your own loving and toilsome practice. ” (letter to Ken Dodson, reported by Penelope Niven, Carl Sandburg: A Biography )

The Ultimate Top Ten Female Cabaret Songs Of All Time

I know the problem, you need a show stopping tune but you are just scratching your head, trying to decide what to sing? Maybe you dream of swapping the hairbrush that you sing down for a real microphone, and the mirror you sing in front of for a real audience. Well have no fear every…

I know the problem, you need a show stopping tune but you are just scratching your head, trying to decide what to sing? Maybe you dream of swapping the hairbrush that you sing down for a real microphone, and the mirror you sing in front of for a real audience. Well have no fear every tune on this list of classic female cabaret songs is guaranteed entertain. And just for fun, I've also given you a bit of background to each song as well. After all you may need a good verbal introduction to that song as well.

1) Big Spender
This raunchy classic was made famous by Shirley Bassey, but actually first appeared in the Bob Fosse musical Sweet Charity.

2) Cabaret
Again, originally a Broadway musical. Made famous by Liza Minnelli in the Bob Fosse directed film of the same name.

3) Falling In Love Again
This one's great if you want a more sultry feel. First performed by Marlene Dietrich in the film 'Der Blaue Engel', she made both the German and English versions her own.

4) Alexander's Ragtime Band.
If you want to try out your jazz chops then, without a doubt, this is the song for you. Not exclusively a female cabaret song, but it was first made famous by Emma Carus. Besse Smith, Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughn subsequentlyave it their seal of approval.

5) If My Friends Could See Me Now
An upbeat, life affirming classic from Sweet Charity.

6) Maybe This Time
Another rousing anthem from Cabaret, although this one was not originally written for the film.

7) Mein Herr
Our third one from Cabaret. If you want fun and comedy in your song then this is the one for you.

8) No Regrets (Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien)
Made popular by 'The Sparrow' herself, Edith Piaf. On it's release she dedicated this song to The French Foreign Legion.

9) Take Me To Your Heart Again (La Vie en Rose)
Another Classic from Piaf. It won the Grammy Hall of Fame award in 1998.

10) The Ladies Who Lunch
A lovely song from the Stephen Sondheim musical Company. Originally stagnated in 1970.

There may be some debate as to whether or not these ten female cabaret songs are indeed the all time greatest but they are all up there, and you will gain confidence in knowing that you have picked a winner. Happy singing!

Tips to Have a Great Neighbourhood

Words like 'neighborhood' and 'community' have lost their meaning over time. The joys of living in a neighborhood where people care for each other and live like one big family can not be explained in words. The worst part is the fact that such families do not exist anymore. We can either recall them in…

Words like 'neighborhood' and 'community' have lost their meaning over time. The joys of living in a neighborhood where people care for each other and live like one big family can not be explained in words. The worst part is the fact that such families do not exist anymore. We can either recall them in our fairy memories or read about them in books. What else can you expect from life in the fast lane, where people are too busy participating in the race called life? However, I feel if we make an approach we can create the very same helpful and caring neighborhood for ourselves, as well as for everyone around all over again. Here are a few tips which would help you all stay motivated.

Arrange weekly get-togethers

I agree to take out time for community or neighborhood get-together can be quite difficult, but taking out a couple of hours each weekend does not sound too much. I know we all have plans for weekends to go out and have fun, but if we try we can definitely carve out some time from our tight schedules. It's all a matter of choice. You may feel a bit odd the first few times, but as you keep meeting each other last week after week, you too will start liking it. Once you develop a liking for these meetings, you too will feel like contributing to the welfare of your neighborhood.

Motivational speaker

You can even call professional speakers once in a month or two to join your get-togeters. It will be a good motivation for everyone in the neighborhood to maintain good relations with each other. Events like these would help instil the feelings of compassion and empathy in everyone's heart and people would be looking forward to attend these every time. These speakers are quite inspirational and would help people dust off the mean and self-centred feelings and to live like good neighbors.

Be caring and helpful

Having a good neighborhood is all about caring for each other and helping each other in times of crisis. Life becomes easy when we know we have people who care about us and would stand there with us through thick and thin. You do not need to go out of your way to be a good neighbor, simple gestures like dropping your neighbors at the airport or picking them up on their return from a vacation; sharing home cooked food with each other are more than sufficient. Visiting those who are sick or injured in the vicinity does spread a good and healthy feeling around. The best thing about doing all this is that when you look after others, you too get looked after. You will not even realize how many people would come to help you in your bad days. Someone has rightly said that whatever you do completes a full circle and comes back to you in the end.

To love and to be loved is the greatest blessing one can ever have. Go ahead, love others and be good, life will seem more beautiful than you actually thought it to be.

4 Reasons Why Comedy Should Be A Part Of Your Life

You laugh to death while watching your favorite comedy show. In fact, you go on a laughing spree and want it to never stop. Laugh crazily in front of your morose buddy, I bet he / she will manage a smile and probably will burst into a big laugh if you persist tenaciously. We bond…

You laugh to death while watching your favorite comedy show. In fact, you go on a laughing spree and want it to never stop. Laugh crazily in front of your morose buddy, I bet he / she will manage a smile and probably will burst into a big laugh if you persist tenaciously. We bond over laughter as we find the times when we laugh around with a bunch of friends to be the happiest. This could well explain why comedians have been given celebrity status. They make a business out of laughter, they sell laughter. For one thing, comedy evokes laughter, but laugh does more than just amuse us.

For Your Mind and Body

If you are stressed out, just tune in to a comedy channel and soon you'll have yourself rolling on your couch. Who is stressed now? Humor works as an antidote to stress, pain and fatigue. It stimulates the release of endorphins that act as your body's natural painkiller. T-killer cells are released when you undergo a laugh therapy; they are believed to combat carcinogenic substances in your body, keeping cancer at bay. Your heart gets a hearty treat with a good laugh as it improves cardiovascular function with an increase in blood circulation. Above all, your immune system stands strong with a regular dose of laughter. These benefits are too towering to be overlooked.

It Improves Your Emotional Quotient

The greatest comedian the world has ever had, Charles Chaplin, was the embodiment of a strong emotional quotient. All the characters he played were always troubled and devastated, but he always showed a strong emotional outlook. Likewise, whenever you watch a comedy show you develop a positive approach towards solving a problem. It creates a positive psychological impact on you and you tend to feel good, thereby gathering courage and strength to find new ways to a fulfilling life. With a positive attitude, you will find it easier to achieve goals of your life.

You Tend to Build Stronger Relationships and Socialize Better

You may have remarked that your kid responds to your questions well when you are in a jovial mood. You crack jokes with your kid and laugh together, these are signs of a healthy relationships, as you tend to know your kid more especially when he / she is growing up. Moreover, you become more of a friend than just a parent. Similarly, you foster emotional connect with your friends in school, college or office when you engage in a humorous and playful communication. Beside, at times, the office environment gets damn serious due to the work pressure, and if you are the one who knows how to break the ice, go ahead and be the clown. This will not only ease the air but will also make you the most loveable guy.

Your Every Morning is Energetic

Even your sleep welcomes you when you say it hello with a smile rather than with a frown. Obviously, you find it hard to sleep with an anxiety. Taking a brief dose of comedy from TV or radio before sleep every day can actually lure a deep and sound sleep. It's all about the psychological impact of humor that works while you go to sleep, making you feel fresh and energetic every morning.

You may say that comedy is an overall approach to a better and fulfilled life. Even if you indulge in it merely for the sake of amusement, it's worth it.

Australian Artists

When the Opera House is your home, you never know who you are going to meet! It's one of my favorite things about my house: I am always meeting someone new! And most of the time, they are really creative and exciting people. They might be actors or dancers or musicians or directors or artists…

When the Opera House is your home, you never know who you are going to meet! It's one of my favorite things about my house: I am always meeting someone new! And most of the time, they are really creative and exciting people. They might be actors or dancers or musicians or directors or artists – you never know who is going to pop up next!

Sometimes, I like to pretend to be a magazine reporter, and I interview my friends. I'm going to share these interviews with you here, so that you can get to know some of my friends, and also find out about some amazingly talented people that have come to work at my home, the Opera House!

Travis de Vries has a really cool name, and is an awesome dancer! Travis' first performance was when he was five and was playing a farmer in a play at school. But he missed his cue because he fell asleep on stage! Travis does lots of work based on the training he received at NAISDA, which is the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association.

SID: Thanks for not falling asleep and missing our interview, Travis! When did you start performing?

TRAVIS: I've been performing in some capacity for my entire life, but it was not until I went to University in Melbourne to study Fine Arts that I developed a taste for expressing art on stage at the Festival of The Dreaming. I then quit Uni and went to study at NAISDA Dance College and trained to be a professional dance artist.

SID: What have been your career highlights?

TRAVIS: On a personal level my highlights would have to be traveling to New York City to dance in The Lincoln Center (with Bangarra and The AUS Ballet). It was amazing to think that so many other talented people had stood in the same position that I had. It was a great experience and getting a standing ovation in New York did not feel too bad for the soul.

Career wise although my highlights have always been the incredible people I've had the pleasure of working with, during my time at Bangarra Dance Theater I was blessed with the chance to work with Stephen Page and the team there.

SID: What are you currently working on?

TRAVIS: At the moment I'm working on so many things, I've recently taken a full time job as an arts professional so creatively I'm a bit slow. But as always, I do have a few things in the pipeline: A collection of works on canvas that are vignettes of everyday people doing extra-ordinary things; a short solo dance film set in the back alleys of Sydney, and also I am slowly carving my way into writing what I think will turn out to be my first novel.

SID: You sure have lots of great ideas bubbling away! What advice would you give to aspiring artists?

TRAVIS: Make the most of every aspect of life. Find art in the little things and turn them into big things. Find joy, happiness, sadness, pain, pleasure – then find a way to turn any emotion you have into artistic expression. Do whatever you have to, every day, to be inspired and then hopefully in turn you will be the inspiration for someone else.

SID: There's always something amazing that can give us new ideas every single day! Do you have a favorite memory from working at my home, the Opera House?

TRAVIS: My first time in the Opera House was as a performer for the DEADLY Awards where I performed on the Concert Hall. Looking from the stage at the empty seats in the concert hall where I would later hopefully wow a full house of people was both a harrowing and uplifting experience. I will always remember that first moment in a place that is now like a second home to me.

I would have to say that looking at the Opera House from underneath the Sydney Harbor Bridge and watching the sun peek its head over the sails is one of the most inspiring sights in Sydney.

SID: Thank you Travis! I can not wait to see your creations!

Salsa Dancing – Understanding the Different Styles

1: LA Style The LA style salsa has been developed in Los Angeles by the Vazquez brothers. It is a very linear form of dancing that incorporates the contemporary mambo basics (forward and backward movement) with a variation of the men breaking forward on count '1'. This type of dancing is known for its flashy…

1: LA Style

The LA style salsa has been developed in Los Angeles by the Vazquez brothers. It is a very linear form of dancing that incorporates the contemporary mambo basics (forward and backward movement) with a variation of the men breaking forward on count '1'. This type of dancing is known for its flashy moves and the dramatic moves with an intensive use of various dips, drops and tricks which are executed by the guys. Most of the movements in this dance pattern are created from cross body lead variations and footwork patterns. This creates a complicated set of speedy and jazzy footwork moves. The LA style of salsa incorporates many other forms of dancing, including the hip-hop and the jazz. This makes it very difficult for the dancers to perform, but it does make a difference to the eye of the people watching it. It has very close resemblance to the New York style of salsa, which explains their incredibly diverse collection of moves, but they have their differences in their approach to the ebb, the styling and their flow of movement. If we take a close look at their way of dancing from an external window, we can easily point out the differences in their dancing forms. The New York style of salsa is composed of a more elegant and smoother look and feel for the dance, whereas the LA style of salsa dancing requires the dancers to give an incredible display of explosive tricks which would catch one's attention at the split of a second . The execution of the movements is highly crisp and sharp with a vivid appeal. The most distinctive feature of he LA Style of Salsa is its quest for including the most difficult acrobatics within the dance and the outstanding amount of power the dancers denote to their performances on the stage.

2: New York Style

The LA style and the New York style of Salsa are very closely linked to each other as they both share the Mambo basics and are both linear in execution. But unlike its counterpart, the New York style of Salsa has earned a reputation for being danced on the second beat of music, 'on 2', whereas there are many New Yorkers who still dance on 1. This type of Salsa is known for its more relaxed and elegant way of dancing. This incorporates cross body turning patterns as well as a complicated set of foot-works which are known for being smooth and controlled. These with some intricate technical movements, make the dance look more elegant, graceful and flowing. The etiquette of this type of dancing forces the dancers to remain in their slots and do not move around the whole dance floor with a lot of spins and styling. The New York type of Salsa puts greater emphasis on performance that will shine out from others, including their partners. This introduces situations, where the dancers do separate from their partners and dance solo for some amount of time. There are basically two types of variations of new York type of salsa which are the Contemporary Mambo (or the Eddie Torres Style) and the Palladium style. The Eddie Torres style of new York Salsa was popularized by Eddie Torres who is also known as the “Mambo King”. This form of dancing is recognized by its continuous and smooth body movements and change of feet at the non-weight changing counts of '4' and '8'. Unlike the Eddie Torres Style, the Palladium style of Salsa is more like the Mambo style of the 1950's where the non-weight changing occurs at the counts of '1' and '5'. This minor difference in the counts may not look too much to you, but can drastically change the visual dynamics for someone dancing Salsa. The New York style tends to have a lot of variations, compared to other forms of dancing, in its interpretations and explanation of the basic steps. As this type of dancing is very compact, it needs less space compared to other forms of dancing, so making it an ideal style of dancing on busy floors.

3: Cuban Style

The Cuban style of Salsa which is also known as the Casino style, has its origins from Cuba. Many Cubans consider Casino to be a part of their social and cultural lifestyle, thus making dancing casino an expression for their popular social culture. They have dedicated a lot of popular music for the Cuban Style Salsa. The term Casino comes from the dance halls “Casino Deportivos”, where the white Cubans used to meet and dance during the mid 20th centuries. The Casino has its origins from the partner dance of Cuban Son, which has been fused with partner figures and turns from the North American Jive. The Casino style Salsa is characterized by the Afro Cuban style body movements which uses full body isolation and frequent hip movements. The hip movement is highly noticeable due to the earthquakeized pumping of the knees. The Cuban style Salsa does not have a lot of fast spins and basically depends upon the circular movements of the dancers around each other. They tend to have very simple footworks, but have a highly complex arm work which requires the follower to have highly flexible arms. Having similarities with the Son, Danzon and the Cha Cha, the Cuban style Salsa is traditionally danced as a “Contratiempo”. In this method of dancing, the 1st and 5th beats in the clave pattern are ignored but the 4th and 8th beats are heavily emphasized while dancing. In this manner, the dancers do not have to follow to the beats, and can have their own special contribution to the dance using the polyrhythmic pattern of the music. The dance has its life, not from the mechanical technique that can be taught in a class, but from the understanding and use of the Afro-Cuban culture and the vocabulary of the Casino dance. The same way in which a singer quotes other older songs in their own songs, a Casino dancer will frequently use other dances, movements, gestures and folklore passes and try to improve upon them. The Casino dancers try to improve by including extracts from the dances for African deities, the Rumba, and other popular dances like the Danzon and the Cha Cha Cha.

4: Rueda de Casino

During the 1950's, a group dance by Guaracheros de Regla, named Rueda de Casino, or Casino Rueda, or simply known as Rueda, became very popular in Havana, Cuba. The name of the dance reflects to the style of dancing involved which includes the complicated turns and steps involved in the dancing. In this form of dance, a lot of couples dance in a circle, whereas a dancer, who is designated as the caller, performances hand movements, signaling which moves to be executed, and the corresponding move is executed by all the couples simultaneously. The dancing couples move around in a circle, with leaders rapidly moving partners and performing numerous complicated movements in synchronization, all to the beats of the salsa music. Every move has a name and is communicated to the dancing couples with hand signals from the caller. The calls are sometimes made in extreme quick successes, creating a very dynamic atmosphere for the dancers to perform. One of the most noteworthy features of the Rueda de Casino form of Salsa is that it can hold as many numbers of dancers as possible that can be accommodated within the available space. It can be performed with two couples as well as multiple tens of couples. Sometimes, the dancers even create multiple number of circles to dance in. The Rueda de Casino form of Salsa creates a whole new definition of Group Dynamics. It creates a unique level of awareness and understanding between the dancers, which is required to make the dance group look stylish and have a smooth flow, which will be enjoyable for both the dancers as well as the viewers. The dancers have to open up their peripheral vision to know what the other dancers are doing and perform accordingly. In this way, the dancers start coordinating with the other dancers in perfect timing and style to make the Rueda de Casino work. This form of dancing also includes partner switching, which is very tricky to execute, but makes it exciting to watch. One of the benefits of learning La Rueda de Casino, is that the moves learned in Rueda can also be executed with only one partner, then adding it to the dancer's repertoire of various moves.

Disney Casting Calls Give Kids And Teens Legit Shot At Stardom

When Disney vice president of casting and talent relations Judy Taylor was recently asked about where she finds talent for Disney Channel and Disney XD shows she stated, “we try here at Disney Channel, for many reasons, to look everywhere and have open calls all over the place to reach kids who may not have…

When Disney vice president of casting and talent relations Judy Taylor was recently asked about where she finds talent for Disney Channel and Disney XD shows she stated, “we try here at Disney Channel, for many reasons, to look everywhere and have open calls all over the place to reach kids who may not have the chance to audition if they were only taking place in LA or New York. ” The last several years Disney has held open casting calls in the cities of Richmond, Kansas City, Phoenix, Austin, San Antonio, and Wilmington. Thousands of hopefuls attended these calls with dreams of becoming the next Disney Channel star.

No matter what the expectations are of a child, teen, or parent who attends one of these open casting calls, the harsh reality is that the odds of being discovered are extremely small. But when someone is discovered, it can be a life-changing event that catapults a young person into worldwide fame. This is exactly what happened one year when Disney Channel held open casting calls in Texas and Florida. An amazing 11-year-old little girl showed up and impressed Judy Taylor and other Disney casting managers veryly. This child ended up becoming the second most popular Disney Channel star history, earning countless awards including six Kids' Choice Awards, fifteen Teen Choice Awards, two Young Artist Awards, a People's Choice Award, and an ALMA Award. So talent is very much discovered at these open calls, and they are no public stunt or gimmick, as many skeptical people falsely claim.

It is a fact that the vast majority of acting roles for Disney Channel and Disney XD are cast in Los Angeles. Judy Taylor hires freelance casting directors to do the day-to-day casting for individual series and movies. These casting managers use talent agents to bring in actors to come in and read for the specific roles. Sometimes the casting managers will call in someone who is not signed with a talent agent, however these are usually for smaller roles called Under 5's – meaning having less than 5 lines of dialog. Extras in the United States are not represented by agents and are hired directly through extras casting companies.

Another exciting trend in the entertainment industry is online submissions for acting roles. With the advent of digital casting, talent can now submit headshots and resumes through email, or online talent databases. There are only a few legitimate online databases, so knowledge about these websites is crucial. During the summer of 2013, the casting directors for a new hugely anticipated Disney Channel show sent out a casting notice for series regulars. They specified that kids and teens outside of Los Angeles from all areas could submit an audition video. So it is official that Disney is now on board the digital online open casting call wagon. So the opportunities are real, and they are out there. Whether it's an in-person open casting call, or an online talent search – kids and teens now have more opportunities than ever to chase their dreams of working as an actor on Disney Channel and Disney XD.

Beyond ‘Breaking Bad’: 5 TV Shows Aaron Paul Should Guest Star

The infamous drama series Breaking Bad has reached its series finale. Aaron Paul, one of the series hottest actors, will be well suited for guest starring roles on popular TV shows. Aaron Paul is now unemployed from television. The 34-year-old, two time Emmy-winning actor shot into notoriety with his highly acclaimed role as the dynamic…

The infamous drama series Breaking Bad has reached its series finale. Aaron Paul, one of the series hottest actors, will be well suited for guest starring roles on popular TV shows.

Aaron Paul is now unemployed from television.

The 34-year-old, two time Emmy-winning actor shot into notoriety with his highly acclaimed role as the dynamic Jesse Pinkman on the hit AMC drama series, Breaking Bad . The Emmy-winning series soon came to an end on Sunday, September 29, 2013 after five seasons of capturing and shocking viewers.

Paul brings a wicked shrewdness, a calm fervor and a sarcastic wit to his role. It is only fair to say now that the most amazing, undaunted cult-followed TV shows in history has aired its final episode, there will be more than a few viewers who will be morose to see Aaron go. Below are my picks for five TV shows that Aaron Paul should guest star on after “Breaking Bad”.

Parks and Recreation
The NBC mockumentary sitcom follows the ridiculous transactions of Pawnee, Indiana's public officials as they pursue various undertakings improve their town.

The role: Guest appearance as a right-seeking pharmacist who wants to bring a new pharmacy that would offer pharmaceutical accessibility and personal service to Pawnee. After all, he does know a little bit about producing and selling drugs.

House of Cards
The Netflix exclusive political drama series about Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey), the Democratic congressman from South Carolina, who is raging retribution on Washington DC politicians after being snubbed for Secretary of State.

The role: Guest appearance as a new legislative aid that saves Zoe Barnes (Kate Mara) and confronts the slick-talking Underwood. He knows how to keep his head down but get the job done. He will shrewdness to this character.

Law and Order SVU
The NBC police crime drama about the elite detective squad of NYPD who investigate sexual crimes begins where the last season concluded, with Olivia Benson (Mariska Hargitay) held captive by the maniacal William Lewis (Pablo Shreiber).

The role: Guest appearance as a slick-talking psychiatrist who saves Benson from herself after she rescued and begins suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress. In spite of everything, he has been locked up and held at gunpoint in almost every season of Breaking Bad .

The Big Bang Theory
The CBS comedy sitcom examines the lives of four nerdy and socially out of depth scientists.

The role: Guest appearance as a chemist colleague who works at Caltech with Leonard Hofstadter (Johnny Galecki). He learned from the best and will bring a new dimension to chemistry and nerdiness.

Orange Is the New Black
The hit Netflix comedy-drama series about Piper Chapman (Taylor Schilling), a 30-something that is enacted to over a year in prison after being convicted for transporting drug money for her girlfriend (Laura Prepon) nearly a decade prior.

The role: Guest appearance as newly recorded corrections officer at Litchfield Prison for training while George 'Pornstache' Mendez (Pablo Screiber) is on administrative leave. Neverheless he knows a little about learning on-the-job.

Performing Arts Degree Programs

Earning a degree in performing arts is not an easy task, nor is finding a job after graduating in certain fields. Those who choose to study performing arts have often been participating in their interest since they were very young, and have grown up practicing their art daily. Performing arts degrees allow students to major…

Earning a degree in performing arts is not an easy task, nor is finding a job after graduating in certain fields. Those who choose to study performing arts have often been participating in their interest since they were very young, and have grown up practicing their art daily. Performing arts degrees allow students to major in performing arts such as dance, music, music education, acting, and design / technology.

Those who choose to work in this industry typically possess the following qualities: outgoing, hard working, detail oriented, ambitious, and passionate. Performers understand the need to have a great stage presence, work very hard to be perfect in their routine, and try to earn the lead role. Even performing art majors who do not choose to dance or perform for a living understand how cutthroat the entertainment business can be. Most individuals are looking to rise to the top of their field / performance status, not stay in a lower position. Employers find these characteristics very appealing because it means these employees will typically work hard, complete detailed tasks quickly, and strive to receive promotions and take on more responsibility.

By majoring in dance, participants are preparing themselves to learn various types of dance, and how to carry out dances while developing performance skills. Students will study dance techniques such as modern, classical, and ballet, among others. In order to be accepted into one of these programs, students will need to audition for faculty. Audition pieces typically require applicants to perform a ballet or contemporary routine.

Students who are interested in becoming an actor will study courses that will prepare them for careers in the theater and other related areas. Individuals in this major need to be extremely outgoing, dramatic, well-spoken, and creative to become successful in this position. Students will learn about fundamental vocal and physical skills, perform in chamber theater, cabaret, and community performances, and hone their skills in both solo and group work.

Individuals may also simply earn a Bachelor of Arts in Performing Arts. This will give them a general understanding of the many skills involved in music, drama, and dance. Sample courses may include musical theater, dance technique, dramatic literature, music performance, theater history, and dance and culture. Those who earn this degree can work in positions such as dance performance and choreography, film and theater direction, talent management, and the entertainment industry business, to name a few.

Some students choose to minor in performing arts and major in business or English. This will give them a fundamental background in a subject area of ​​interest, while establishing skills more suited to a non-performance career. For example, individuals who wish to write screenplays would more likely major in English, and take courses that would show how to create screenplays and how the writing would translate to the stage.

Un-Paid Gigs – Are They Worth It?

For some reason, un-paid job experiences are very common in the arts industry. From theater to jogging to writing, if you are an artist and have been working for at least a year in any of these industries, you are no stranger to this. We are going to avoid the question of “why these jobs…

For some reason, un-paid job experiences are very common in the arts industry. From theater to jogging to writing, if you are an artist and have been working for at least a year in any of these industries, you are no stranger to this.

We are going to avoid the question of “why these jobs are out there.” (It goes without saying that we all know some are justified and embedded in our industry culture, and others are just cheap clients who know they can take advantage of an artist's love for the arts.) The point is: they are out there. So the big question becomes, is it really worth it to do jobs for free? Do these experiences benefit your career?

To answer this question, I spoke to six different artists who have successfully broken into their respective arts industries and happened to utilize these free experiences in the beginning of their career.

The main question was simple: “Do you feel these experiences (un-paid) were necessary in your growth as an artist?” Answer: Most of us will be excited to find out that every single artist agreed to the un-paid experiences being worth it!

So, if these artists say the experiences are worth it, then our next question is: “What are the benefits of these experiences?”

Well, here is what the artists had to say:

Networking – A great way to get in contact with good directors and choreographers is to work for free. This immediately adds to your resume and if you are really talented, that director or choreographer will remember you for the paid experiences!

Friendship – The arts is a tough career. We can all agree to this. Sometimes the most talented of artists can struggle their whole life just to make ends meet. In these un-paid experiences you may be able to connect to the abundance of amazing people out there that are just like you!

Experience – Participating in these experiences is great way to add things to your resume. It kind of sounds like “the chicken and the egg” conundrum if you do not go through these experiences! If you need experience to get jobs … how do you get “experience” if no one will hire you because of “lack of experience” in the first place? This is kind of solved if you are able to perform for free.

Knowledge – This was so beautifully put, I am not going to paraphrase. Here was the complete response from Sharon Rose, co-owner of Sacred Mysteries Productions and Sacred Mysteries Distribution: “Every performing experience adds to one's real knowledge of oneself, the medium, the audience. dancers in particular, who have a strong kinesthetic awareness, can receive a direct visceral response to their presence and their work. ”

Personal & Spiritual Take-Aways – When you are working for free, experiences seem to be more adventurous. There are no rules. When you are on a journey with no rules, unique things happen and people surprise you and come through in amazing ways. One artist experienced the time of her life and ultimate hospitality when a town turned her un-paid experience into a glimpse of stardom!

Training – When it comes down to it, you are receiving real industry training for free. Somebody trusts your work enough to give you the chance to perform and continue to develop your craft. Do not ever forget this and always continue to learn.

Defines Passion – It's hard to get distracted and unfocused when you are getting paid to do something. But, when you take the pay away, you have to have pure passion to continue your journey. These experiences allow you to really hone in on what you want in your career and what you really love about the arts.

There you have it: Unpaid experiences in the arts community are worth it and the benefits are numerous! The next time you are faced with a decision to participate in a job for free, whether it is in the middle of your career or at the very beginning, make sure to fully evaluate and remember the possible benefits!

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I would like to thank the following people for sharing their insights and life experiences for this article, without them, this would not be possible!

Christopher Gooley
Arundhati Singha
Joanna Pilatowicz
Sharron Rose
Melissa Linburg
Lauren Ashley
Bobby Blakely
Ben Schiffer

Five Guidelines to Make Your Newsletter More Effective

Hello My Savvy Children! It's time for a little e-lovin 'from me to you and today we're going to lift up the e-newsletter. So, good news! Savvy actors are sharing their successes through e-blasts, letting the world know about the great projects they're helping to bring into the world. In fact, MANY of them are.…

Hello My Savvy Children! It's time for a little e-lovin 'from me to you and today we're going to lift up the e-newsletter.

So, good news! Savvy actors are sharing their successes through e-blasts, letting the world know about the great projects they're helping to bring into the world.

In fact, MANY of them are.

Okay, so many of them are that my inbox is saying a bit in the tide of “Just wanted to let you know what I'm up to” s.

I'm feeling like they're coming at me. I want to feel like they're inviting me in.

Hey, I'm a newsletter guy too. In fact, EVERY time I send out a newsletter, I book work from it. Every. Time.

And when I lapse, I get e-mails from friends asking if they've been dropped from the list.

Because e-newsletters are more effective when they're done right. And now Papa Doug's gonna show you how through five guidelines.

1. Start with your brand

Most e-newsletters I receive are big exclamation points where every experience was just the best !!!!

Being positive is a beautiful thing, but we are not all drawn that way. Return to those adjectives that describe what you sell as a performer and then WRITE WITH YOUR OWN VOICE.

Are you a geek? Revel in delicious detail.

Are you ethereal? Choose breath language language that comes from feeling.

Are you blunt? Choose percussive language and short sentences.

Gossipy? Political? Bone-dry? Curmudgeonly?

Speak from your brand … and then format your newsletter with colors and a font to match.

2. Get to the point.

Hey, your e-newsletter is a marketing tool.

Get to the point.

That's why I'm going to use really efficient bullet points in this section.

  • Bullet points will direct the eye to where you want it to go.
  • Keep it brief.
  • Challenge yourself to keep it to one pane (so they do not have to scroll down.)
  • Make your subject line useful. “Doug Shapiro starting his 13 th season with The Barnstormers” is stronger than “update.”
  • Provide contact information so they know how to find you for work leads.
  • Provide a picture to make associating your face with your name easier.
  • Provide links to your shows that make ticket purchasing easier.

3. Be considerate

You want everyone who receives your newsletter to be glad about it, right? Well, you can assure that with some basic consideration for their needs.

Make it easy for people to unsubscribe (MailChimp is great for sending bulk mail and makes it easy to unsubscribe.)

Only send to Industry folks who are very familiar with and enjoy you. Agents and casting managers receive hundreds, even thousands of e-mails per day and it's highly unlikely that they'll open anything from someone of what they're not big fan already.

Give credit to others who made your successes possible. (I'd like to thank Rebecca Soler who gave the great subject line and window pane advice in her fantastic seminar.)

Also, make sure that every picture or video you provide is linked through a website rather than in the body of the e-mail. You do not want to clog up their inbox!

4. Be consistent

My FOD's get a little antsy now if they have not heard from me every two or three months. So, keep those e-newsletters coming on whatever consistent basis you choose.

That said, save up your successes. No need to barrage people with your glorious successes every time something happens. It's exhausting for them and for you. Spread out your e-lovin 'to your fans over a consistent time frame.

5. Be a good host

You can either choose to shout information at people or invite them into the life party you're throwing. Make them feel like they're a part of something.

Just like an effective audition or job interview, choose to set an environment that welcomes your fans into an experience . I refer to my audience as FOD's. (Friends / Family of Doug) and start by inviting them to kick, back, relax, and enjoy the e-journey.

How do you create a welcoming environment? By keeping your e-newsletter about your readers and not about yourself. When you send out information dumps of all your accomplishments, it projects desperation.

Become sensitive to the difference between “I played the lead in this show” and “Joe Director [with link to director's website] welcomed the best work out of our own ensemble.” Both say you're working, but only the latter shows you're enrolling other great people on your journey. So, use the opportunity to hold up your collections. I choose to list the actors and design crew for every project I do, with links to their websites. It increases my readers' involvement because they recognize their colleges and e-mail me back with “Hey! You know Alexandra de Suze! I love Alexandra de Suze!”

While you're at it, be the go-to person for whatever it is you love.

Are you passionate about new music theater work? Feature a music theater writing team like Carner & Gregor. Crazy about baby animals? Link to zooborns.com. Old time radio comedy? Link to a Jack Benny video on YouTube. Connect with your readers about something other than the shows in which you're performing.

So, Savvy Actors, be your own Marketing Director and create an e-newsletter that sings with your essence without just crowing about your successes. Effective marketers choose information that is useful to their audience over information they just really want to share. Now get busy and share it!

Ballet Is An Art Not A Contest

For some years now there has been gathering attention, publicity and even some degree of notoriety surrounding the largest ballet competitions such as Youth American Grand Prix (YAGP) and the International Ballet Competition (IBC) which at first might seem like a good thing – to coin a Hollywood phrase, 'the only thing worse than bad…

For some years now there has been gathering attention, publicity and even some degree of notoriety surrounding the largest ballet competitions such as Youth American Grand Prix (YAGP) and the International Ballet Competition (IBC) which at first might seem like a good thing – to coin a Hollywood phrase, 'the only thing worse than bad publicity is no publicity'. But there is something else at stake here and it is no small thing.

Along with this appearing upward trend of publicity for ballet because of YAGP and IBC and other competitive dance shows and contests, there has been a precipitous decline and even removal of arts education from public and even many private schools. On the face of it these two seem unrelated except that the average age of a competitor at the major ballet competitions – 14 – is precisely the same age as the students in middle school and high school who are stepping off into the void of no education as to what the arts are, no application of how to practice any of them for their original intent (which is the creative exploration of existence not prize winning) and this comes on the heads of an elementary experience which for nearly all students, including anyone participating in YAGP or IBC, etc., has shown a scary fall off in creative thinking and imagination development during the elementary education process.

Those of us who are priviledged to work in the arts and ballet are all aware of these trends among beginners through intermediate aged students. Unfortunately, there has been a major move to turn the arts into some kind of contest sport for the sake of ratings by the people who run YAGP and the IBC and all those TV dance competition shows and so rather than helping to do something about the declination of imagination and creatvity amongst beginner to intermediate age students. Exactly what this is contest sport ballet stuff is supposed to do or who it is supposed to benefit is very unclear because other than the TV channels who earn ad revenue and the organizational bodies of the YAGP and the IBC making money off of the very high fees charged for these events, the performers involved and the art form of ballet receive practically nothing in return. Who wants to grow up and train for 10+ years as an artist to be a profitable property for a TV station to sell ads through – none of that money coming to you? Who wants to grow up and train for 10+ years as an artist to spend $ 4,000 or more each year in competition fees to the YAGP for the sake of possibly getting a professional contract when you can still accomplish that by first becoming a good dancer in a competent ballet program then auditioning directly for a professional company?

Professional companies still do almost all their hiring by the live audition. So, for any student wishing to be employed by Boston Ballet or Houston Ballet or Pacific Northwest Ballet, the YAGP and IBC are utterly NOT essential. Somehow a hood has been pushed over everyone's eyes such that people think if they spend thousands and thousands of extra dollars doing YAGP, IBC or other competitions that their student will somehow be put in a great position to be hired by a professional company – that is just flat out wrong. What has happened is a distortion of the art form of ballet into somekind of contest sport where the end-all-be-all is the quest for awesome technique. That sort of pursuit is neat but almost useless should you wish to make a compiling Juliet or a tragic Giselle. Especially considering that nearly all of those 14 year olds who achieve robotic perfection in their technique will burn out and be done with Ballet before they even graduate high school rendering all that effort useless to the future of ballet, but very lucrative to the organizers of the YAGP, the IBC, and so forth.

Ballet has always been an art form where a long career span can be possible – women can readily perform into their early 40's, men into their mid-30's – as opposed to many other sports and especially Competitive Gymnastics wherein there is almost no such thing as a 20 year old competitor, usually not even an 18 year old competitor due to the ultra high, severely traumatic injury rate. But now, as more and more of these YAGP type competition circles run on, a near equivalent and equally burdensome attrition young dancers occurs only instead of lifelong crippling injuries they simply quit the art form due to burnout. But not before shelling out tons of cash.

Obviously competition itself is a healthy thing and for sure ballet is VERY competitive already simply because you have thousands of dancers all over the world constantly seeking to get into the best dozen or so ballet companies and from there that level of competition continues right on down to regional professional ballet companies Milwaukee Ballet or Tulsa Ballet. So there never was any lack of competitiveness in ballet to begin with – in fact, far from it. But now, over and above that type of healthy competition that makes people want to improve their technique in order to get into the company they like as a professional dancer, the contest sport type of competition has been wedged into ballet the only purpose of which can be to make money for the organizers – those types of competitions do not help the art form advance at all (due to that high burn out rate among young contestants), and they are unnecessarily unnecessary for anyone who wants to pursue professional dance work.

It would be really helpful to ballet and the arts if the organizers of the YAGP, the IBC, and the other competitions and TV competition shows, would realize the golden opportunity they have to reinvigorate the sensibility and enjoyment of the performing arts as something other than a mere vehicle for someone else's judgment as to who wins blue ribbons, something more intuitive than a contest sport, and as something other than a means for the organizers to score very large sums of money through endless types of competition fees. Or, let's put it in another way: a ballet dancer is someone who must first enjoy the artistic, creative process because that is what the art is still built upon, and is someone who also enjoys pursuing their own technique not just for mechanical perfection like 7 pirouettes, but emotional conveyance, story telling, and being interesting to watch while working on stage. These competitions do exactly what George Lucas so prophetically warned about concern his own work with Star Wars: “… a special effect by itself is uninteresting without a compelling story to go with it.”

Pirouettes and saut de basques are awesome special effects but they are not nearly enough by themselves to make ballet compelling as an art form. If this focus on contest sport continues unabated then we will have lots of Jedi-like 14 year olds in ballet who burn out and quit long before they are mature enough to tell compelling stories, and that would be a real, substantial shame and a stunning waste of money, time and effort.

How to Succeed at Acting Auditions

Getting the part in a show, commercial, or play means going to acting auditions. You need to prove that you have what it takes to become the character. The people behind the project want to see what you are capable of doing, and auditioning is the key. In order for you to be a success,…

Getting the part in a show, commercial, or play means going to acting auditions. You need to prove that you have what it takes to become the character. The people behind the project want to see what you are capable of doing, and auditioning is the key. In order for you to be a success, you need to learn how this process works and what you should be doing. If you can make it through, you are going to be one step closer to being a professional actor.

Before you get into auditing, you need to make sure that you are prepared. This means having your resume, photo, and monologue ready, along with anything else that you need to have for the specific audition. The photo should be current and attractive, the resume should include everything about your acting history along with the best contact information, and the monologue should show off your skills. Another important part of being prepared is confidence. When you walk in, you should do so confidently and with everything that you need. This is going to make a wonderful first impression, which will increase your chances of getting the part.

With acting auditions, you should get straight to the point and try to do your best. Choose what you know and can do then go with it. Do not try to simply appeal to what you think anyone else wants. This may cause you to choose something that you can not do well, which could actually hurt your chances of getting the part more than it would help. Part of showing confidence is choosing something on your own and powering through it. Even if you mess up, continue what you are doing and show that you know how to manage these little mistakes. Remember that you are probably not as bad as you may think.

Do not let one bad experience ruin acting judgments for you. Continue to go and build up your skills. You never know when one will be successful, so try to find the motivation to go whenever you can. On top of increasing your chances of landing a job, it also helps you to improve your performance. Each time that you go, you will be able to make changes to see what works. This will give you both the confidence and ability you need. It also makes the experience as a whole much easier on you. When you have been through the process many times, the weight of the stress is lessened quite a bit.

If you want to do your best at acting auditions in general, consider going to classes. They will teach you what you need to know in order to do your best. You are going to be learning from professionals in the field, so you will receive inside information.You will also develop some confidence. This is a great first step to becoming an actor and getting the jobs that you really want.

Must-Have Entertainment For Children’s Parties

If money permits, try to go all out when organizing a kiddy party. Children grow up so fast and you want them to enjoy all that innocent fun has to offer. There are countless ideas to try, a few of which are tried, tested and loved. When organizing a party for children, choose entertainment depending…

If money permits, try to go all out when organizing a kiddy party. Children grow up so fast and you want them to enjoy all that innocent fun has to offer. There are countless ideas to try, a few of which are tried, tested and loved.

When organizing a party for children, choose entertainment depending on the age and the number of guests. More guests mean more requirements because just one or two will not be able to cater to everyone. Check out these ideas which are sure to thrill kids up to 10 or 11 years of age.

Clowns

Who says clowns are creepy when all they want is to make children happy? Choose from any number of party hire services for one who's experienced, genuinely funny and guarantees to entertain with a bagful of tricks. You can even hire a pair or multiple clowns to stage comedies that will appeal to very young and slightly older children.

When hiring clowns, take a look at their portfolios. Even better, have them do a sample show so you know exactly what you're paying for. Chances are you will not have much trouble finding a suitable one.

Jumping castles

Designed for older children, jumping castles are a hoot. There are just so many fun components that children will be kept busy for hours. Choose from butterfly castles and giraffes to cars and princesses.

Adults too can enjoy the fun with inflatables designed specifically for them. So if you're struggling to come up with entertainment ideas for young adults, look no further than adult jumping castles.

Face painting

It's been done many times but face painting still remains a fun and exciting-driven party affair. You can get a few friends together and become artists for a day or you can hire professionals. The latter choice is perfect because artists are well-versed in giving form to children's vivid imaginations. They charge by the hour or for a day. If you've planned a string of events, opt for hourly artists.

Magicians

See children go spellbound with a stage magician who can wow them with card tricks, coin tricks and a host of enthralling kiddy magic tricks. Kids can even take on the role of assistants.

Jugglers

Hire a juggler or two to teach children the art of multitasking. Most are willing to give a few points. Jugglers who main clientele are adults can also be hired to entertain your friends with morearing skills.

Treasure hunt

Complete the carnival-like festivals with a treasure hunt which is great entertainment for young and older children alike. You'll have to do some planning with the clues and placement of the grand prize but it'll give you a chance to hone your detective skills too. Take the help of a friend and try to create hints that are challenging but not difficult to solve.

Remember to serve up delectable treats children love like candy, ice cream, fruit shakes and, of course, healthy food. If you do manage to hire and organize all the entertainment ideas given here, try to create a balance between all. For instance, set up the jumping castle and designate a few friends to monitor the activity while having the clowns entertain children close by. This will give the guests more to do and watch. Then, bring out the painters, magician and jugglers. Set the treasure hunt for last because it'll require participation from all, if not most, of the guests.

Great Riddlers: William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare is commonly thought of as the greatest playwright, and even writer, of all times. Living from 1564 to 1616 he wrote about 38 plays including Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Macbeth. Aside from his career as a playwright he also performed as an actor frequently and ran playing companies through his career. He…

William Shakespeare is commonly thought of as the greatest playwright, and even writer, of all times. Living from 1564 to 1616 he wrote about 38 plays including Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Macbeth. Aside from his career as a playwright he also performed as an actor frequently and ran playing companies through his career. He began this successful career between 1585 and 1592; continuing this successful career until his death in 1616. Since his death has plays have become even more popular and he has become even more famous. All of his plays are translated into the major languages ​​and his plays are performed more frequently than those of any other playwright ever.

Shakespeare uses many literary devices through his plays to enhance them and portray their meanings in multiple ways. One of these devices that he uses very frequently is riddles. Looking at most of his plays, a lot of them contain riddles in their literal sense. Shakespeare uses these riddles to convey the morals and themes of each of these plays. He frequently does this by using a third party or secondary character to introduce the riddle to the main character, allowing them to see some aspect of the world in a different way. Riddles are based on a double or veiled meaning so they can be seen in a variety of different ways. This allows the riddles to act as an eye-opening experience for the protagonist of the story, changing the way they look at the world.

One of the greatest examples of a riddle in one of William Shakespeare's plays comes from Hamlet. Just before Hamlet and Horatio talk to the gravediggers one of the gravediggers requests the other who builds stronger than a mason, shipwright, or carpenter. The answer to this ominous question is a gravedigger because the houses they build will last forever. One of the main themes of Hamlet is death and how uncertain we are about it. What a mason, shipwright and carpenter build are so tangible and living people move past them but a grave is definite and mysterious. This is one of the realization Hamlet makes after his father, the King, dies.

Shakespeare is one of the greatest poets and playwrights of all time and he will be remembered forever for his contribution to literature and more dearly to riddles. LaThere there has been some debate about the true author of his plays, but regardless, he is the face of literature.